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10 Hacks and Tricks That Will Make Any Party Great Slideshow


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Throwing parties can be incredibly rewarding and a lot of fun, but it can also be stressful and overwhelming. Try not to stress yourself out this holiday season. These useful strategies are simple ways to keep your party running smoothly and stress-free. From frozen fruit to mismatched plates, we’ve compiled the perfect list for fall party success.

Table Decoration Disaster

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Throwing parties can be incredibly rewarding and a lot of fun, but it can also be stressful and overwhelming. From frozen fruit to mismatched plates, we’ve compiled the perfect list for fall party success.

Beer Case Cooler

Place a garbage bag inside an empty beer case and fill it up with ice to create a disposable cooler. Use whatever beer box you buy as your recycled cooler. It’s a DIY project that keeps brews cold, while representing the brewery they came from.

Bottle Opener Access

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The one thing people are always searching for at a party is a bottle opener. Use colorful ribbons to tie bottle openers to your coolers or bins for easy access. That way, you don’t have to worry about trying alternative methods of opening your drinks.

Cup Speakers

Don’t have speakers, but want to show off your party playlist? Use a mug or cup, and place your phone’s speaker at the bottom. The sound will amplify and no one will notice that you aren’t using a sound system.

Frozen Fruit

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Keep your wine chilled with frozen fruit. The wine will not be watered down, and, with red berries, you create an elegant fall wine glass. You could even throw some frozen fruit into your sangria mix to keep it cold and looking berry beautiful.

Labeled Drinks

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Guests hate when they can’t find the beverage they’re looking for, because they’re searching five coolers filled with different drinks. Instead, cut the labels out from the beer or water boxes you use and tape the drink’s name to the top of the cooler to make searching more efficient. This cute labeling idea will save you, and your guests a lot of trouble.

Muffin Tins for Condiments

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Use your muffin tins to hold various condiments at any party. Throw loose ketchup, guacamole, mustard, or any other condiment into one of the muffin tin spots. Make sure to use cupcake cups to hold your condiments for an easy cleanup. Whether you’re serving juicy burgers or pumpkin fries, these easy holders will provide an array of options to top off your dinner.

Pepper Bowls

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Use red, green, and yellow peppers as bowls for your delicious homemade dips or appetizers! Just cut off the pepper tops, and place your appetizer inside. This eliminates having to wash more dishes at the end of the night, while also adding more color to your crudités.

Individual Chips and Dip

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Everyone loves crowding around the creamy appetizer dips you’ve prepared, but your beautiful creation may face overcrowding and double dipping. Try putting your seven layer dip into individual cups with tortilla chips sticking out. Guests can walk around with their personal dips, and no one has to worry about sticking their chip into a picked-over mess.

Spicy Mess

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If your slightly spicy dish has turned into a hot mess, try adding buttermilk, yogurt, or heavy cream to balance out the heat. Spicy stews and sauces will quickly lose that extra bite for a more mild spice taste.

Table Decoration Disaster

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You’ve accumulated plenty of mismatched plates and bowls over the years, and you don’t want to go out and buy all new dishes for your dinner party. Try adding candles and small, fresh flower bouquets to the table for fall décor that distracts from the mismatched plates. It may take a surprising turn where guests love eating off their fun-designed plates.


10 Incredible Garlic Hacks

Entertainment/celebrity, wellness, and general interest writer based in Los Angeles.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.


10 Incredible Garlic Hacks

Entertainment/celebrity, wellness, and general interest writer based in Los Angeles.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.


10 Incredible Garlic Hacks

Entertainment/celebrity, wellness, and general interest writer based in Los Angeles.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.


10 Incredible Garlic Hacks

Entertainment/celebrity, wellness, and general interest writer based in Los Angeles.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.


10 Incredible Garlic Hacks

Entertainment/celebrity, wellness, and general interest writer based in Los Angeles.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.


10 Incredible Garlic Hacks

Entertainment/celebrity, wellness, and general interest writer based in Los Angeles.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.


10 Incredible Garlic Hacks

Entertainment/celebrity, wellness, and general interest writer based in Los Angeles.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.


10 Incredible Garlic Hacks

Entertainment/celebrity, wellness, and general interest writer based in Los Angeles.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.


10 Incredible Garlic Hacks

Entertainment/celebrity, wellness, and general interest writer based in Los Angeles.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.


10 Incredible Garlic Hacks

Entertainment/celebrity, wellness, and general interest writer based in Los Angeles.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.

There it is, sitting on your shelf next to that old box of sea salt, a smelly little wonder substance that has been thought to help people avoid certain types of cancer, lower their cholesterol and amp up their immune systems during flu season. We speak of garlic, the beloved stinking rose and global-cuisine superstar. "Garlic is one of nature's best medicines," says Courtney Abrams, a health coach at Roslyn Wellness. "It contains a chemical called allin, which when chewed converts into allicin, an acidic compound that reacts with free radicals (those byproducts of digestion that mess with our DNA and cellular membranes) and destroys them." Some people should use it carefully: Avoid it if you are taking blood-thinning medication or are prone to stomach ulcers. Here are 10 hacks for getting the most out of your garlic, retaining its therapeutic properties and preparing it more easily.