Other

A very fig tart


Ingredients

  • pâté brisee
  • 1/2 Cup creme de marron
  • 3 Tablespoons fig jam
  • 8-10 plump, ripe figs
  • 1/2 Teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 Teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 Tablespoon balsamic glaze (for drizzling on top)

Directions

Fig tart with chestnut cream

1. Preheat oven to 350F. Wash and trim the figs and slice them into fairly thin rounds – you should get about 4 pieces out of each fig.

2. Roll out pastry and drape it over your cake pan – I suggest using a deeper springform pan here. Crimp the edges, leaving a pretty high ‘border’ for the filling to expand and bubble away.

3. Swirl together the fig jam and chestnut cream and spread evenly on the bottom of the tart. Layer the fig slices on top the the filling, making one layer, then going over a second time to fill in any ‘gaps.’ You want this to be a very fig tart, remember!

4. Sprinkle figs with lemon juice and a little bit of cinnamon. Drizzle balsamic glaze on top in a crisscross pattern.

5. Bake for about 40-45 minutes until the pastry is golden and the filling is jammy. Let set and cool completely before cutting.


Baked fig tart

One of Gumnut Patisserie’s best sellers is their baked fig tart. You can substitute the tart with strawberries, but it’s hard to go past fresh figs when they are in season. Head chef Tracy Nikl of Gumnut loves this dish, adding that the simple dishes are often the best.

Preparation

Cooking

Skill level

Ingredients

  • 10 figs, cut into wedges (alternatively, use
  • 250 g strawberries, cut in half)

Sweet dough

  • 110 g butter, softened
  • 110 g caster sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 240 g flour
  • 2.5 g baking powder
  • vanilla bean (optional)

Clafoutis mix

  • 4 eggs
  • 35 g caster sugar
  • 165 ml pouring cream
  • ½ tbsp kirsch

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Drink match Campbells Rutherglen Topaque NV, Rutherglen, Vic

"Surely a more satisfying and life-affirming dessert would be hard to find. And to match it you’d do well to go for something equally soothing for the soul. With the eggy, creamy mixture, the rich pastry and the delicious baked figs you need a wine with sufficient richness and texture but not overbearing sweetness. Campbells Rutherglen Topaque (formerly known as Tokay) is the perfect candidate because of the complementary fig and toffee flavours and wonderful structure that shows just enough acid to carry the day." - Dan Coward

To make the sweet dough, combine the butter and sugar together in a mixer. Add the egg, and scrape down the sides. Add the dry ingredients and again scrape down the sides. Rest for 1 hour.

Roll out the dough, remembering to roll in different directions with your rolling pin. Carefully lay the pastry over a pastry ring, 20 cm x 2 cm, on a lined, flat baking tray, ensuring there are no cracks or holes in the pastry. If there are cracks, lightly bake the case blind for five minutes with baking beans. Egg wash the case and bake without the beans for a further 2 minutes.

For the clafoutis mix, crack the eggs into a bowl. Whisk in the caster sugar, followed by the cream and kirsch. Line the tart base with fresh figs, cut side up.

Pour over the clafoutis mix. Bake for 20–25 minutes, or until the clafoutis mix is just set.


Fig tart with mascarpone cream

The end of summer in Los Angeles can sneak up on you, the heat lingering, even rising, the days stalling out into a blissful torpor. Then suddenly it’s Labor Day and the school buses and USC Trojan linemen are on the move, and you look into the market stalls and those glorious ripe figs have vanished along with your vacation time.

So grab up the baskets of sweet dusky Black Mission figs, mild Brown Turkey figs, pale green Kadotas with their soft mauve interiors. Take them down from their branches if you’re the lucky proprietor of a backyard tree or pick them up from the farmers markets or grocery produce aisles. For the next few weeks, figs will be as ubiquitous as late-season tomatoes.

They’ll be pretty spectacular too. After a summer of slow heat and almost overwhelming dryness, the region may be a bit parched, but this season’s figs are outstanding.

Tree-ripened, their sugars built by the final weeks of summer, figs are most flavorful when they’re near the end of their season. Unlike dried figs, sturdy and familiar, fresh figs are also surprisingly ephemeral. Their soft, leathery skin, which houses a system of tiny florets -- it’s not really a fruit, but an inverted flower -- is delicate, and fully ripened figs should be eaten quickly. Left for even a few days, their rich interior can lose flavor and get woody in texture.

Fabled to have grown in the Garden of Eden, the fig has a beautiful, secretive architecture and a rich, low flavor that makes it a nearly perfect dessert. Eaten alone, just off the tree, its taste is subtle, almost cool. Halved and placed on a plate, maybe drizzled with honey, a splash of balsamic vinegar or served with a nub of young goat cheese or assertive blue, the fig is magnificent.

Wrapped with prosciutto, grilled and tossed into a frisee and walnut salad or poached in red wine, figs pair equally well with sweet and savory dishes. Or, for a stunning display, layer a mascarpone tart with slices of sweet Black Mission figs, the lush purple and pale magenta colors of the fig like an edible palette, the sweet notes of the figs balanced by the sheen and faint bite of a balsamic glaze.

“Nothing is sweeter than figs,” observed Aristophanes. Especially now, when they’re at their peak, their flavors concentrating in the closing weeks of summer. Just don’t wait too long.


Fig & Marmalade Tart

Recently I had a workman at my apartment to fix something, and in chatting with him, I discovered that he had the most incredible passion for figs! Indeed, he had spent much of his non working life learning about them, and is now growing them with success on his block just north of Melbourne.

Two days later, he dropped off a few boxes for me to try out, and so this lovely Fig Tart was created!!

Please make this for morning or afternoon tea and enjoy with friends and their stories about what they are passionate about!

Recipe uses a large flan tart - 22.5cm but you could go slightly bigger as well with this recipe!

130g Soft Butter (unsalted)

1/4 preserved lemon wedge chopped finely

3 eggs at room temperature

1/2 Tsp baking powder (sifted)

6 Ripe figs - de stemmed and quartered

90g of your favourite marmalade - I use Josh and Sue’s for this and also their preserved lemon!

In a mixing bowl, add butter, sugar, citrus rinds and vanilla paste and beat until light and fluffy - about 6 mins

Add one egg at a time to the mix, beating until mix combines between each new egg addition - this will stop the mix from splitting!

Once mix is combined, fold in almond flakes, and stir to combine

Spoon mix into tart case and spread evenly until you have a smooth surface

Press fig quarters into mix gently in any way that you think looks nice, then place into oven for about 45mins to cook. The tar will look golden and skewer will come out clean

While the tart is baking, put your marmalade into a microwave safe container and zap until melted - this will be your glaze for the top of the tart

When the tart is cooked, remove from oven and brush with the marmalade glaze until covered, then put back into oven for a couple of mins to heat again.

Serve on its own, or with a dollop of Creme fraiche or just with a sprinkle of icing sugar before you serve it!

Please tag me and let me know if you make this one - it’s a delicious bake and always gets rave reviews!


Roasted figs chocolate ganache tart

Decadent, rich chocolate ganache filling, a nutty crust and juicy sweet fresh figs make this roasted figs chocolate ganache tart a treat for a special occasion. And not to worry, it is super easy to make.

If I have to pick one, just one fruit towards the end of summer, hands down is going to be fresh figs. I’ve been in love with figs for years and every summer I look for them at the local farmer’s market or grocery store. As much as I would like to have a fig in the back yard these figs came for California. And as much as I would like to say I hand picked them from the tree, I bought them from the local grocery store.

Either way, hand picked by me or just picked from the produce section of the store fresh figs make my heard skip a beat.

After eating almost a whole box in just few days I remembered this chocolate fig tart recipe from my friend Sylvie. I have saved it since she shared the recipe 2 years ago and have been waiting for the right time to make it.

Few weeks ago seemed like the perfect time. And my friends agreed with me. The whole 11″ tart was gone in no time!

If you’ve never had figs and chocolate, well I highly advise you to give it a try. In my opinion is as good, or maybe even better than chocolate and strawberries and i’m pretty sure everyone know how insanely good that combo is!

This roasted figs chocolate ganache tart was adapted from Sylvie’s tart. Although I did not add roasted figs at the bottom of the part like Sylvie did (because I ate most of them while waiting for the crust to chill) I made sure each slice got at least one piece of roasted fig on top.

The crust is made gluten free, using ground pecans and rolled oats while the ganache is made from a combo of bittersweet and semisweet chocolate and heavy cream. If you want a vegan version, you can use coconut milk like Sylvie did.

Decadent, rich chocolate ganache filling, a nutty crust and juicy sweet fresh figs make this roasted figs chocolate ganache tart a treat for a special occasion


Recipe

Step 1: To make the crust, combine the flour, cornmeal, sugar, and salt in a food processor and pulse to combine. Add the butter and pulse 4 or 5 times, until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

Step 2: In a small bowl, stir together the ice water and egg yolk. Add the egg mixture to the food processor and pulse until the crumbs begin to climb the side of the bowl and hold their shape when pressed together.

Step 3: Turn the dough out onto a work surface. Using your hands — and a little muscle — form the dough into a 5″ diameter disc. Wrap it in plastic wrap and refrigerate it for at least 1 hour or as long as 24 hours before rolling

Step 4: Unwrap the dough, and using a rolling pin, roll it out on a lightly floured work surface to form an 11″ circle. Working quickly and carefully, line a 9″ tart pan with the dough. With your fingertips, make sure that the edge of the tart is smooth and even. Refrigerate it for 20 minutes.

Step 5: Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Step 6: Remove the tart pan from the refrigerator. Line the crust with tin foil, making sure to cover the sides, and fill it with dried beans or pie weights. Bake for 15 minutes. Rotate the pan and bake for 15 more minutes, or until the sides are somewhat firm and hold their shape. Remove the foil and bake for 6 minutes, or until the bottom of the crust looks dry and the shell is a very pale golden colour. Remove the pan from the oven and let the shell cool.

Step 7: To make the filling, beat together the mascarpone and sour cream in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Then beat on medium speed for 1 minute. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the honey and vanilla, and mix on medium speed for 30 seconds.

Step 8: When the crust is cool, spread the filling evenly in the bottom. Arrange the figs, cut side up, in a circular pattern on top of the filling. The tart will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 days, but it is best when eaten the same day it is assembled.

Reprinted with permission from Dawn Casale and David Crofton’s One Girl Cookies (2012 Clarkson Potter).

Ingredients

Crust
1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cornmeal
2 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp table salt
8 tbsp (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
3 tbsp ice water
1 large egg yolk

Filling
1 cup mascarpone cheese
2/3 cup sour cream
1/2 cup honey
1 tsp vanilla extract
8 to 12 fresh figs, halved*

* Figs can vary a great deal in size. It is most important to look for plump, good-looking figs.

Directions

Step 1: To make the crust, combine the flour, cornmeal, sugar, and salt in a food processor and pulse to combine. Add the butter and pulse 4 or 5 times, until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

Step 2: In a small bowl, stir together the ice water and egg yolk. Add the egg mixture to the food processor and pulse until the crumbs begin to climb the side of the bowl and hold their shape when pressed together.

Step 3: Turn the dough out onto a work surface. Using your hands — and a little muscle — form the dough into a 5″ diameter disc. Wrap it in plastic wrap and refrigerate it for at least 1 hour or as long as 24 hours before rolling

Step 4: Unwrap the dough, and using a rolling pin, roll it out on a lightly floured work surface to form an 11″ circle. Working quickly and carefully, line a 9″ tart pan with the dough. With your fingertips, make sure that the edge of the tart is smooth and even. Refrigerate it for 20 minutes.

Step 5: Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Step 6: Remove the tart pan from the refrigerator. Line the crust with tin foil, making sure to cover the sides, and fill it with dried beans or pie weights. Bake for 15 minutes. Rotate the pan and bake for 15 more minutes, or until the sides are somewhat firm and hold their shape. Remove the foil and bake for 6 minutes, or until the bottom of the crust looks dry and the shell is a very pale golden colour. Remove the pan from the oven and let the shell cool.

Step 7: To make the filling, beat together the mascarpone and sour cream in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Then beat on medium speed for 1 minute. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the honey and vanilla, and mix on medium speed for 30 seconds.

Step 8: When the crust is cool, spread the filling evenly in the bottom. Arrange the figs, cut side up, in a circular pattern on top of the filling. The tart will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 days, but it is best when eaten the same day it is assembled.

Reprinted with permission from Dawn Casale and David Crofton’s One Girl Cookies (2012 Clarkson Potter).


Fig Tart

I came across these beautiful figs in my local supermarket and jumped on them! Figs are only available for a very short period of time in Switzerland, and I always seem to miss them. But not this year!

The next question was… What to make? I wanted to make a dessert that would really highlight the fruit seeing as they were nice and ripe. I decided to use a combination of fresh and cooked figs for my dessert.

I opted for making a fig tart, adding an almond cream and caramelised stewed figs to complement the fresh fig topping. After a couple of experiments, I found that baking the tart for a few minutes really improved the texture and the juiciness of the fresh figs.

Make ahead option

There are different components to this tart but you can make most of them ahead of time. Here’s a schedule to help you plan.

2 days earlier: prepare the shortcrust pastry and refrigerate until ready to use.

1 day earlier: make the almond cream and stewed figs.

1 day earlier: bake the shortcrust pastry and set aside

On the day: put everything together


  • For the Pastry Cream
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/8 cup cornstarch
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • grated zest of 1/2 orange
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla paste or vanilla extract
  • 1/16 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 1 tablespoon cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • For the Crust
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 stick butter
  • 1/8 cup sugar, or 2 tablespoons
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 egg yolk
  • For the Fruit Topping
  • 18 to 20 fresh figs, halved through the stem ends
  • 1 whole fig
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons sanding sugar

To make the crust: In a bowl, whisk the flour to aerate it set aside.

In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter, sugar, and salt on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl halfway through. Add the whole egg and the yolk, and mix to combine. Add the flour and beat until it has been absorbed. There will still be streaks of butter visible.

Scoop the dough onto a sheet of plastic wrap, shape into a flattened disk, and wrap in the plastic. Refrigerate until firm, at least 2 hours.

To make the pastry cream:In a medium, heat-proof bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, 1/8 cup of the sugar, all of the cornstarch, and 1/4 cup of the milk set aside.

In a medium saucepan, combine the remaining 3/4 cup milk, the remaining sugar, the vanilla paste (or vanilla extract), the orange zest, and the salt. Bring to a simmer. Whisking constantly, gradually pour the hot milk into the egg mixture to temper it. Set a strainer over the saucepan. Strain the custard mixture back into the saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat, whisking constantly. Boil for 10 seconds, whisking. (Make sure the custard boils for 10 seconds in the center of the pan, not just around the sides.) The mixture should thicken to a pudding-like consistency.

Transfer the pastry cream to a bowl and whisk in the butter. Whisk in the vanilla extract, if using. Cover with plastic wrap, pressing it directly on the surface of the cream to prevent a skin from forming. Refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.

Putting it all together: On a lightly floured work surface, roll the dough to a 12-inch round, about 1⁄8 inch thick. Fit the dough into a 9-inch fluted tart pan with a removable bottom and trim the dough so that it comes slightly above the rim of the tart pan. Press the excess dough against the sharp edge of the rim of the pan with the heel of your hand to cut it level with the pan. Chill until firm, about 30 minutes.

Arrange the oven rack in the lower third of the oven. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick silicone baking mat.

Spread the pastry cream over the bottom of the pie shell. Arrange the fig halves on top, rounded edges down, shingled tightly and in concentric circles. Quarter the remaining whole fig, leaving the quarters connected at the base. Place in the center of the tart so that the quarters open like the petals of a flower. Brush the figs with the butter and sanding sugar evenly over the top.

Bake, rotating the baking sheet about two-thirds of the way through the baking time, until the pastry is cooked through and the figs are tender and caramelized, about 40 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool.


Fig and frangipane tarts recipe

Sweet and almondy tartlets that'll transport you right to a French patisserie.

Ingredients

  • 170 g plain flour, plus extra for rolling
  • 100 g cold unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tbsp ice-cold water
  • 6 oz plain flour, plus extra for rolling
  • 3.5 oz cold unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tbsp ice-cold water
  • 6 oz plain flour, plus extra for rolling
  • 3.5 oz cold unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tbsp ice-cold water
  • 100 g butter, at room temperature
  • 100 g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 0.5 tsp almond extract
  • 100 g ground almonds
  • 9 figs, quartered
  • 1 tbsp flaked almonds
  • 3.5 oz butter, at room temperature
  • 3.5 oz caster sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 0.5 tsp almond extract
  • 3.5 oz ground almonds
  • 9 figs, quartered
  • 1 tbsp flaked almonds
  • 3.5 oz butter, at room temperature
  • 3.5 oz caster sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 0.5 tsp almond extract
  • 3.5 oz ground almonds
  • 9 figs, quartered
  • 1 tbsp flaked almonds
  • 1 tsp icing sugar
  • 6 tbsp crème fraîche
  • 1 tsp icing sugar
  • 6 tbsp crème fraîche
  • 1 tsp icing sugar
  • 6 tbsp crème fraîche

Details

  • Cuisine: French
  • Recipe Type: Dessert
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Preparation Time: 30 mins
  • Cooking Time: 40 mins
  • Serves: 6

Step-by-step

  1. For the pastry, put the flour, butter and salt in a food processor and pulse until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.
  2. Transfer to a bowl and add the egg yolk mixed with a tablespoon of cold water to make a smooth but not sticky dough. Add the extra tablespoon of water if required.
  3. Put the dough on a floured work surface, roll it out and line 6 loose-bottomed 10&ndash12cm (4&ndash4.7in) tartlet tins. Chill for about 30 minutes.
  4. Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F/gas mark 6.
  5. Line each tin with a circle of baking parchment or foil, add baking beans and bake blind for 10 minutes. Remove the beans and paper, then put the tins back in the oven for a further 5 minutes. Turn the oven down to 190°C/375°F/gas mark 5.
  6. While the pastry cases are cooking make the frangipane. Beat the butter and sugar together in a bowl until you have a smooth paste. Gradually whisk in the eggs and almond extract, then stir in the ground almonds and mix well.
  7. Divide the mixture between the pastry cases and arrange 6 fig wedges on top of each tart. Scatter with some of the flaked almonds and bake for 20&ndash25 minutes until golden.
  8. Dust with a little icing sugar and serve warm or at room temperature with some crème fraîche.

This recipe is extracted from Rick Stein&rsquos Secret France (BBC Books, £26). Photography by James Murphy.

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How to Make It

Trim stems off figs. Cut figs into 1/8-in.-thick slices and put in a large bowl. Bring 6 cups of water to a boil and pour over figs. Let sit 10 minutes. Drain and put figs in a large pot over medium-high heat with wine, 1 cup sugar, and 1/2 tsp. salt. Bring to a boil. Meanwhile, tie up peppercorns, cinnamon, allspice, and cloves in a 6- by 6-in. piece of cheesecloth and add to pot. Lower heat to maintain a simmer and cook until figs are soft and liquid is reduced to about 3/4 cup, about 2 hours. Remove spices and discard. Stir in vanilla. Let figs and liquid cool to room temperature.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl, stir together flour, remaining 3 tbsp. sugar, and remaining 1/4 tsp. salt. Drop in butter and work it into the flour mixture with your fingertips, a pastry blender, or a fork until it resembles coarse cornmeal with some pea-size chunks. Quickly stir in 2 tbsp. very cold water until dough starts to hold together (it will still be quite crumbly). Gently knead dough 2 or 3 times in bowl, then turn onto a large piece of plastic wrap, shape into a 6-in. disk, cover with wrap, and chill for at least 1 hour and up to 3 days.

Preheat oven to 350°. Place a 10-in. tart pan with a removable rim on a large baking sheet. Butter a large piece of foil. Unwrap dough and put on a floured surface. Roll dough into a 13-in. circle, turning 90° between each pass of the rolling pin to keep it from sticking. Transfer to the tart pan, allowing the dough to fall into place (if you push or stretch it, it will shrink back when baked). Trim edges 1/2 in. past rim of pan and fold down to double the thickness of the tart edge. Set foil, buttered side down, gently onto dough and top evenly with pie weights, dried beans, or rice. Bake 30 minutes. Remove weights and foil and bake until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Let cool.

Arrange cooled figs in cooled crust and pour fig-cooking liquid over them. Let sit at least 1 hour (at room temperature) and up to overnight (in refrigerator). Serve at room temperature, with crème fraîche.


Watch the video: FlourWars Fig Tart with Honey Cream Cheese Filling (December 2021).