Other

Even Mountain Dew Executives Don’t Know What Color Their Soda Is


What color is Mountain Dew? One all its own, if you ask its vice president of marketing

Perhaps one day the English language will evolve to be able to describe the countenance of Mountain Dew.

In a revealing interview with the executives at Mountain Dew, BuzzFeed learned something interesting about the inner workings of the soda company behind one of the most recognizable and visually arresting beverages in the world — even the executives don’t know what to call the color of Mountain Dew.

“We don’t try to say what color the product is internally,” Greg Lyons, vice president of marketing at Mountain Dew, told BuzzFeed News. When pressed for details, Lyons would only refer to the iridescent glow of the soda as “Mountain Dew color.”

When asked to try again, Lyons offered “neon,” though he insisted, “that’s if you’re forcing me to describe it.”

Left up to the company, however, Mountain Dew would prefer that we think of this particular drink as beyond color, if possible. “I’d prefer, if you write about it, it to be Mountain Dew color. Because there’s not really a color we call it.”


Pulitzer Prize board chair wants more editorial entries, especially from smaller newspapers

The chair of the Pulitzer Prize board wants more entries in the editorial-writing competition, and that includes small news organizations.

"You can zero in on important community issues, drawing on your local expertise and insight to produce persuasive editorials," Paul Tash writes, citing the standard for the $5,000 prize: "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction."

That can be accomplished at a newspaper of 2,000 circulation or 200,000, and there have been many examples, from the Golden Quill contest of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors to the Pulitzers themselves. The 2009 prize went to Mark Mahoney, left, of The Post-Star in Glens Falls, N.Y., circulation 35,000, for his editorials showing the danger of secrecy in local government. For more on Mahoney, click here.

Only 54 people put in for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing. No Pulitzer was given for editorial writing in 2012 and 2008, showing that major newspapers often fall short of the standard. Bernard Stein of the weekly Riverdale Press of New York City won in 1998, and Albert Scardino of the weekly Georgia Gazette won in 1984. Roger Linscott of The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Mass., and Paul Greenberg of the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial won in 1972 and 1969, respectively, for editorials on various subjects, showing that the winner does not have to mount an editorial crusade or work for a large newspaper.

No item about rural editors winning Pulitzers would be complete without mention of Hazel Brannon Smith, who won in 1964 but lost her newspaper "for steadfast adherence to her editorial duty in the face of great pressure and opposition" to her support of civil rights in Mississippi Buford Boone of the Tuscaloosa News, who won in 1957 for "fearless and reasoned editorials in a community inflamed by a segregation issue," and Hodding Carter Sr. of the Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville, Miss., who won in 1946 for editorials about racial, religious and economic intolerance.

The deadline to enter 2013 editorials for the 2014 prize is Jan. 25. More information is here.

Political writer spotlights GOP congressman who knows how to channel, cool Tea Party fervor

By Al Cross
Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues

We live in a country where politics seems more polarized than ever, sometimes on a rural-urban divide, and the most divisive players on the left and right get most of the news-media attention. But there are plenty of Republicans and Democrats who pass up the chances to throw rhetorical red meat to their political bases, and U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents Oklahoma's strongly Republican and relatively rural Fourth Congressional District, is one. That is made clear in a story in The New York Times by John Harwood, who accompanied Cole in the district during the August recess.

Rep. Tom Cole, in his district
Harwood's story is headlined "A Different Way for Republicans to Handle Tea Party Seal," which is certainly a timely topic, but the same lessons apply to Democrats and their urban, liberal bases. The easy-talking, matter-of-fact Rep. John Yarmuth of Louisville, Harwood's hometown, is in some ways of mirror image to Cole, left, who comes across in Harwood's piece as a calming influence in a political system that is lurching from crisis to crisis.

Harwood writes that the energy in the Tea Party often makes it harder for Republicans to govern and to win general elections. "Some Republican politicians display an ability to absorb the heat and reflect it back in more politically promising directions," he reports. "That’s why 2016 presidential hopefuls and House leaders could learn from recent town meetings" held by Cole, who "challenged unhappy constituents on tactics, tone and spirit."

Three elements in Cole's approach stood out to Harwood: Realism, about the impracticality of shutting down the government to thwart health reform, and the smallness of foreign aid in the federal budget, for example respect for liberal Democrats, in the face of constituents who consider their elections illegitimate and optimism about the future of the nation: “I’m not one of these people who thinks the country is going to hell in a handbasket.” (Read more)


Pulitzer Prize board chair wants more editorial entries, especially from smaller newspapers

The chair of the Pulitzer Prize board wants more entries in the editorial-writing competition, and that includes small news organizations.

"You can zero in on important community issues, drawing on your local expertise and insight to produce persuasive editorials," Paul Tash writes, citing the standard for the $5,000 prize: "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction."

That can be accomplished at a newspaper of 2,000 circulation or 200,000, and there have been many examples, from the Golden Quill contest of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors to the Pulitzers themselves. The 2009 prize went to Mark Mahoney, left, of The Post-Star in Glens Falls, N.Y., circulation 35,000, for his editorials showing the danger of secrecy in local government. For more on Mahoney, click here.

Only 54 people put in for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing. No Pulitzer was given for editorial writing in 2012 and 2008, showing that major newspapers often fall short of the standard. Bernard Stein of the weekly Riverdale Press of New York City won in 1998, and Albert Scardino of the weekly Georgia Gazette won in 1984. Roger Linscott of The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Mass., and Paul Greenberg of the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial won in 1972 and 1969, respectively, for editorials on various subjects, showing that the winner does not have to mount an editorial crusade or work for a large newspaper.

No item about rural editors winning Pulitzers would be complete without mention of Hazel Brannon Smith, who won in 1964 but lost her newspaper "for steadfast adherence to her editorial duty in the face of great pressure and opposition" to her support of civil rights in Mississippi Buford Boone of the Tuscaloosa News, who won in 1957 for "fearless and reasoned editorials in a community inflamed by a segregation issue," and Hodding Carter Sr. of the Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville, Miss., who won in 1946 for editorials about racial, religious and economic intolerance.

The deadline to enter 2013 editorials for the 2014 prize is Jan. 25. More information is here.

Political writer spotlights GOP congressman who knows how to channel, cool Tea Party fervor

By Al Cross
Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues

We live in a country where politics seems more polarized than ever, sometimes on a rural-urban divide, and the most divisive players on the left and right get most of the news-media attention. But there are plenty of Republicans and Democrats who pass up the chances to throw rhetorical red meat to their political bases, and U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents Oklahoma's strongly Republican and relatively rural Fourth Congressional District, is one. That is made clear in a story in The New York Times by John Harwood, who accompanied Cole in the district during the August recess.

Rep. Tom Cole, in his district
Harwood's story is headlined "A Different Way for Republicans to Handle Tea Party Seal," which is certainly a timely topic, but the same lessons apply to Democrats and their urban, liberal bases. The easy-talking, matter-of-fact Rep. John Yarmuth of Louisville, Harwood's hometown, is in some ways of mirror image to Cole, left, who comes across in Harwood's piece as a calming influence in a political system that is lurching from crisis to crisis.

Harwood writes that the energy in the Tea Party often makes it harder for Republicans to govern and to win general elections. "Some Republican politicians display an ability to absorb the heat and reflect it back in more politically promising directions," he reports. "That’s why 2016 presidential hopefuls and House leaders could learn from recent town meetings" held by Cole, who "challenged unhappy constituents on tactics, tone and spirit."

Three elements in Cole's approach stood out to Harwood: Realism, about the impracticality of shutting down the government to thwart health reform, and the smallness of foreign aid in the federal budget, for example respect for liberal Democrats, in the face of constituents who consider their elections illegitimate and optimism about the future of the nation: “I’m not one of these people who thinks the country is going to hell in a handbasket.” (Read more)


Pulitzer Prize board chair wants more editorial entries, especially from smaller newspapers

The chair of the Pulitzer Prize board wants more entries in the editorial-writing competition, and that includes small news organizations.

"You can zero in on important community issues, drawing on your local expertise and insight to produce persuasive editorials," Paul Tash writes, citing the standard for the $5,000 prize: "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction."

That can be accomplished at a newspaper of 2,000 circulation or 200,000, and there have been many examples, from the Golden Quill contest of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors to the Pulitzers themselves. The 2009 prize went to Mark Mahoney, left, of The Post-Star in Glens Falls, N.Y., circulation 35,000, for his editorials showing the danger of secrecy in local government. For more on Mahoney, click here.

Only 54 people put in for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing. No Pulitzer was given for editorial writing in 2012 and 2008, showing that major newspapers often fall short of the standard. Bernard Stein of the weekly Riverdale Press of New York City won in 1998, and Albert Scardino of the weekly Georgia Gazette won in 1984. Roger Linscott of The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Mass., and Paul Greenberg of the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial won in 1972 and 1969, respectively, for editorials on various subjects, showing that the winner does not have to mount an editorial crusade or work for a large newspaper.

No item about rural editors winning Pulitzers would be complete without mention of Hazel Brannon Smith, who won in 1964 but lost her newspaper "for steadfast adherence to her editorial duty in the face of great pressure and opposition" to her support of civil rights in Mississippi Buford Boone of the Tuscaloosa News, who won in 1957 for "fearless and reasoned editorials in a community inflamed by a segregation issue," and Hodding Carter Sr. of the Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville, Miss., who won in 1946 for editorials about racial, religious and economic intolerance.

The deadline to enter 2013 editorials for the 2014 prize is Jan. 25. More information is here.

Political writer spotlights GOP congressman who knows how to channel, cool Tea Party fervor

By Al Cross
Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues

We live in a country where politics seems more polarized than ever, sometimes on a rural-urban divide, and the most divisive players on the left and right get most of the news-media attention. But there are plenty of Republicans and Democrats who pass up the chances to throw rhetorical red meat to their political bases, and U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents Oklahoma's strongly Republican and relatively rural Fourth Congressional District, is one. That is made clear in a story in The New York Times by John Harwood, who accompanied Cole in the district during the August recess.

Rep. Tom Cole, in his district
Harwood's story is headlined "A Different Way for Republicans to Handle Tea Party Seal," which is certainly a timely topic, but the same lessons apply to Democrats and their urban, liberal bases. The easy-talking, matter-of-fact Rep. John Yarmuth of Louisville, Harwood's hometown, is in some ways of mirror image to Cole, left, who comes across in Harwood's piece as a calming influence in a political system that is lurching from crisis to crisis.

Harwood writes that the energy in the Tea Party often makes it harder for Republicans to govern and to win general elections. "Some Republican politicians display an ability to absorb the heat and reflect it back in more politically promising directions," he reports. "That’s why 2016 presidential hopefuls and House leaders could learn from recent town meetings" held by Cole, who "challenged unhappy constituents on tactics, tone and spirit."

Three elements in Cole's approach stood out to Harwood: Realism, about the impracticality of shutting down the government to thwart health reform, and the smallness of foreign aid in the federal budget, for example respect for liberal Democrats, in the face of constituents who consider their elections illegitimate and optimism about the future of the nation: “I’m not one of these people who thinks the country is going to hell in a handbasket.” (Read more)


Pulitzer Prize board chair wants more editorial entries, especially from smaller newspapers

The chair of the Pulitzer Prize board wants more entries in the editorial-writing competition, and that includes small news organizations.

"You can zero in on important community issues, drawing on your local expertise and insight to produce persuasive editorials," Paul Tash writes, citing the standard for the $5,000 prize: "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction."

That can be accomplished at a newspaper of 2,000 circulation or 200,000, and there have been many examples, from the Golden Quill contest of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors to the Pulitzers themselves. The 2009 prize went to Mark Mahoney, left, of The Post-Star in Glens Falls, N.Y., circulation 35,000, for his editorials showing the danger of secrecy in local government. For more on Mahoney, click here.

Only 54 people put in for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing. No Pulitzer was given for editorial writing in 2012 and 2008, showing that major newspapers often fall short of the standard. Bernard Stein of the weekly Riverdale Press of New York City won in 1998, and Albert Scardino of the weekly Georgia Gazette won in 1984. Roger Linscott of The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Mass., and Paul Greenberg of the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial won in 1972 and 1969, respectively, for editorials on various subjects, showing that the winner does not have to mount an editorial crusade or work for a large newspaper.

No item about rural editors winning Pulitzers would be complete without mention of Hazel Brannon Smith, who won in 1964 but lost her newspaper "for steadfast adherence to her editorial duty in the face of great pressure and opposition" to her support of civil rights in Mississippi Buford Boone of the Tuscaloosa News, who won in 1957 for "fearless and reasoned editorials in a community inflamed by a segregation issue," and Hodding Carter Sr. of the Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville, Miss., who won in 1946 for editorials about racial, religious and economic intolerance.

The deadline to enter 2013 editorials for the 2014 prize is Jan. 25. More information is here.

Political writer spotlights GOP congressman who knows how to channel, cool Tea Party fervor

By Al Cross
Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues

We live in a country where politics seems more polarized than ever, sometimes on a rural-urban divide, and the most divisive players on the left and right get most of the news-media attention. But there are plenty of Republicans and Democrats who pass up the chances to throw rhetorical red meat to their political bases, and U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents Oklahoma's strongly Republican and relatively rural Fourth Congressional District, is one. That is made clear in a story in The New York Times by John Harwood, who accompanied Cole in the district during the August recess.

Rep. Tom Cole, in his district
Harwood's story is headlined "A Different Way for Republicans to Handle Tea Party Seal," which is certainly a timely topic, but the same lessons apply to Democrats and their urban, liberal bases. The easy-talking, matter-of-fact Rep. John Yarmuth of Louisville, Harwood's hometown, is in some ways of mirror image to Cole, left, who comes across in Harwood's piece as a calming influence in a political system that is lurching from crisis to crisis.

Harwood writes that the energy in the Tea Party often makes it harder for Republicans to govern and to win general elections. "Some Republican politicians display an ability to absorb the heat and reflect it back in more politically promising directions," he reports. "That’s why 2016 presidential hopefuls and House leaders could learn from recent town meetings" held by Cole, who "challenged unhappy constituents on tactics, tone and spirit."

Three elements in Cole's approach stood out to Harwood: Realism, about the impracticality of shutting down the government to thwart health reform, and the smallness of foreign aid in the federal budget, for example respect for liberal Democrats, in the face of constituents who consider their elections illegitimate and optimism about the future of the nation: “I’m not one of these people who thinks the country is going to hell in a handbasket.” (Read more)


Pulitzer Prize board chair wants more editorial entries, especially from smaller newspapers

The chair of the Pulitzer Prize board wants more entries in the editorial-writing competition, and that includes small news organizations.

"You can zero in on important community issues, drawing on your local expertise and insight to produce persuasive editorials," Paul Tash writes, citing the standard for the $5,000 prize: "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction."

That can be accomplished at a newspaper of 2,000 circulation or 200,000, and there have been many examples, from the Golden Quill contest of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors to the Pulitzers themselves. The 2009 prize went to Mark Mahoney, left, of The Post-Star in Glens Falls, N.Y., circulation 35,000, for his editorials showing the danger of secrecy in local government. For more on Mahoney, click here.

Only 54 people put in for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing. No Pulitzer was given for editorial writing in 2012 and 2008, showing that major newspapers often fall short of the standard. Bernard Stein of the weekly Riverdale Press of New York City won in 1998, and Albert Scardino of the weekly Georgia Gazette won in 1984. Roger Linscott of The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Mass., and Paul Greenberg of the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial won in 1972 and 1969, respectively, for editorials on various subjects, showing that the winner does not have to mount an editorial crusade or work for a large newspaper.

No item about rural editors winning Pulitzers would be complete without mention of Hazel Brannon Smith, who won in 1964 but lost her newspaper "for steadfast adherence to her editorial duty in the face of great pressure and opposition" to her support of civil rights in Mississippi Buford Boone of the Tuscaloosa News, who won in 1957 for "fearless and reasoned editorials in a community inflamed by a segregation issue," and Hodding Carter Sr. of the Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville, Miss., who won in 1946 for editorials about racial, religious and economic intolerance.

The deadline to enter 2013 editorials for the 2014 prize is Jan. 25. More information is here.

Political writer spotlights GOP congressman who knows how to channel, cool Tea Party fervor

By Al Cross
Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues

We live in a country where politics seems more polarized than ever, sometimes on a rural-urban divide, and the most divisive players on the left and right get most of the news-media attention. But there are plenty of Republicans and Democrats who pass up the chances to throw rhetorical red meat to their political bases, and U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents Oklahoma's strongly Republican and relatively rural Fourth Congressional District, is one. That is made clear in a story in The New York Times by John Harwood, who accompanied Cole in the district during the August recess.

Rep. Tom Cole, in his district
Harwood's story is headlined "A Different Way for Republicans to Handle Tea Party Seal," which is certainly a timely topic, but the same lessons apply to Democrats and their urban, liberal bases. The easy-talking, matter-of-fact Rep. John Yarmuth of Louisville, Harwood's hometown, is in some ways of mirror image to Cole, left, who comes across in Harwood's piece as a calming influence in a political system that is lurching from crisis to crisis.

Harwood writes that the energy in the Tea Party often makes it harder for Republicans to govern and to win general elections. "Some Republican politicians display an ability to absorb the heat and reflect it back in more politically promising directions," he reports. "That’s why 2016 presidential hopefuls and House leaders could learn from recent town meetings" held by Cole, who "challenged unhappy constituents on tactics, tone and spirit."

Three elements in Cole's approach stood out to Harwood: Realism, about the impracticality of shutting down the government to thwart health reform, and the smallness of foreign aid in the federal budget, for example respect for liberal Democrats, in the face of constituents who consider their elections illegitimate and optimism about the future of the nation: “I’m not one of these people who thinks the country is going to hell in a handbasket.” (Read more)


Pulitzer Prize board chair wants more editorial entries, especially from smaller newspapers

The chair of the Pulitzer Prize board wants more entries in the editorial-writing competition, and that includes small news organizations.

"You can zero in on important community issues, drawing on your local expertise and insight to produce persuasive editorials," Paul Tash writes, citing the standard for the $5,000 prize: "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction."

That can be accomplished at a newspaper of 2,000 circulation or 200,000, and there have been many examples, from the Golden Quill contest of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors to the Pulitzers themselves. The 2009 prize went to Mark Mahoney, left, of The Post-Star in Glens Falls, N.Y., circulation 35,000, for his editorials showing the danger of secrecy in local government. For more on Mahoney, click here.

Only 54 people put in for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing. No Pulitzer was given for editorial writing in 2012 and 2008, showing that major newspapers often fall short of the standard. Bernard Stein of the weekly Riverdale Press of New York City won in 1998, and Albert Scardino of the weekly Georgia Gazette won in 1984. Roger Linscott of The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Mass., and Paul Greenberg of the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial won in 1972 and 1969, respectively, for editorials on various subjects, showing that the winner does not have to mount an editorial crusade or work for a large newspaper.

No item about rural editors winning Pulitzers would be complete without mention of Hazel Brannon Smith, who won in 1964 but lost her newspaper "for steadfast adherence to her editorial duty in the face of great pressure and opposition" to her support of civil rights in Mississippi Buford Boone of the Tuscaloosa News, who won in 1957 for "fearless and reasoned editorials in a community inflamed by a segregation issue," and Hodding Carter Sr. of the Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville, Miss., who won in 1946 for editorials about racial, religious and economic intolerance.

The deadline to enter 2013 editorials for the 2014 prize is Jan. 25. More information is here.

Political writer spotlights GOP congressman who knows how to channel, cool Tea Party fervor

By Al Cross
Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues

We live in a country where politics seems more polarized than ever, sometimes on a rural-urban divide, and the most divisive players on the left and right get most of the news-media attention. But there are plenty of Republicans and Democrats who pass up the chances to throw rhetorical red meat to their political bases, and U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents Oklahoma's strongly Republican and relatively rural Fourth Congressional District, is one. That is made clear in a story in The New York Times by John Harwood, who accompanied Cole in the district during the August recess.

Rep. Tom Cole, in his district
Harwood's story is headlined "A Different Way for Republicans to Handle Tea Party Seal," which is certainly a timely topic, but the same lessons apply to Democrats and their urban, liberal bases. The easy-talking, matter-of-fact Rep. John Yarmuth of Louisville, Harwood's hometown, is in some ways of mirror image to Cole, left, who comes across in Harwood's piece as a calming influence in a political system that is lurching from crisis to crisis.

Harwood writes that the energy in the Tea Party often makes it harder for Republicans to govern and to win general elections. "Some Republican politicians display an ability to absorb the heat and reflect it back in more politically promising directions," he reports. "That’s why 2016 presidential hopefuls and House leaders could learn from recent town meetings" held by Cole, who "challenged unhappy constituents on tactics, tone and spirit."

Three elements in Cole's approach stood out to Harwood: Realism, about the impracticality of shutting down the government to thwart health reform, and the smallness of foreign aid in the federal budget, for example respect for liberal Democrats, in the face of constituents who consider their elections illegitimate and optimism about the future of the nation: “I’m not one of these people who thinks the country is going to hell in a handbasket.” (Read more)


Pulitzer Prize board chair wants more editorial entries, especially from smaller newspapers

The chair of the Pulitzer Prize board wants more entries in the editorial-writing competition, and that includes small news organizations.

"You can zero in on important community issues, drawing on your local expertise and insight to produce persuasive editorials," Paul Tash writes, citing the standard for the $5,000 prize: "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction."

That can be accomplished at a newspaper of 2,000 circulation or 200,000, and there have been many examples, from the Golden Quill contest of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors to the Pulitzers themselves. The 2009 prize went to Mark Mahoney, left, of The Post-Star in Glens Falls, N.Y., circulation 35,000, for his editorials showing the danger of secrecy in local government. For more on Mahoney, click here.

Only 54 people put in for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing. No Pulitzer was given for editorial writing in 2012 and 2008, showing that major newspapers often fall short of the standard. Bernard Stein of the weekly Riverdale Press of New York City won in 1998, and Albert Scardino of the weekly Georgia Gazette won in 1984. Roger Linscott of The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Mass., and Paul Greenberg of the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial won in 1972 and 1969, respectively, for editorials on various subjects, showing that the winner does not have to mount an editorial crusade or work for a large newspaper.

No item about rural editors winning Pulitzers would be complete without mention of Hazel Brannon Smith, who won in 1964 but lost her newspaper "for steadfast adherence to her editorial duty in the face of great pressure and opposition" to her support of civil rights in Mississippi Buford Boone of the Tuscaloosa News, who won in 1957 for "fearless and reasoned editorials in a community inflamed by a segregation issue," and Hodding Carter Sr. of the Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville, Miss., who won in 1946 for editorials about racial, religious and economic intolerance.

The deadline to enter 2013 editorials for the 2014 prize is Jan. 25. More information is here.

Political writer spotlights GOP congressman who knows how to channel, cool Tea Party fervor

By Al Cross
Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues

We live in a country where politics seems more polarized than ever, sometimes on a rural-urban divide, and the most divisive players on the left and right get most of the news-media attention. But there are plenty of Republicans and Democrats who pass up the chances to throw rhetorical red meat to their political bases, and U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents Oklahoma's strongly Republican and relatively rural Fourth Congressional District, is one. That is made clear in a story in The New York Times by John Harwood, who accompanied Cole in the district during the August recess.

Rep. Tom Cole, in his district
Harwood's story is headlined "A Different Way for Republicans to Handle Tea Party Seal," which is certainly a timely topic, but the same lessons apply to Democrats and their urban, liberal bases. The easy-talking, matter-of-fact Rep. John Yarmuth of Louisville, Harwood's hometown, is in some ways of mirror image to Cole, left, who comes across in Harwood's piece as a calming influence in a political system that is lurching from crisis to crisis.

Harwood writes that the energy in the Tea Party often makes it harder for Republicans to govern and to win general elections. "Some Republican politicians display an ability to absorb the heat and reflect it back in more politically promising directions," he reports. "That’s why 2016 presidential hopefuls and House leaders could learn from recent town meetings" held by Cole, who "challenged unhappy constituents on tactics, tone and spirit."

Three elements in Cole's approach stood out to Harwood: Realism, about the impracticality of shutting down the government to thwart health reform, and the smallness of foreign aid in the federal budget, for example respect for liberal Democrats, in the face of constituents who consider their elections illegitimate and optimism about the future of the nation: “I’m not one of these people who thinks the country is going to hell in a handbasket.” (Read more)


Pulitzer Prize board chair wants more editorial entries, especially from smaller newspapers

The chair of the Pulitzer Prize board wants more entries in the editorial-writing competition, and that includes small news organizations.

"You can zero in on important community issues, drawing on your local expertise and insight to produce persuasive editorials," Paul Tash writes, citing the standard for the $5,000 prize: "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction."

That can be accomplished at a newspaper of 2,000 circulation or 200,000, and there have been many examples, from the Golden Quill contest of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors to the Pulitzers themselves. The 2009 prize went to Mark Mahoney, left, of The Post-Star in Glens Falls, N.Y., circulation 35,000, for his editorials showing the danger of secrecy in local government. For more on Mahoney, click here.

Only 54 people put in for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing. No Pulitzer was given for editorial writing in 2012 and 2008, showing that major newspapers often fall short of the standard. Bernard Stein of the weekly Riverdale Press of New York City won in 1998, and Albert Scardino of the weekly Georgia Gazette won in 1984. Roger Linscott of The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Mass., and Paul Greenberg of the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial won in 1972 and 1969, respectively, for editorials on various subjects, showing that the winner does not have to mount an editorial crusade or work for a large newspaper.

No item about rural editors winning Pulitzers would be complete without mention of Hazel Brannon Smith, who won in 1964 but lost her newspaper "for steadfast adherence to her editorial duty in the face of great pressure and opposition" to her support of civil rights in Mississippi Buford Boone of the Tuscaloosa News, who won in 1957 for "fearless and reasoned editorials in a community inflamed by a segregation issue," and Hodding Carter Sr. of the Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville, Miss., who won in 1946 for editorials about racial, religious and economic intolerance.

The deadline to enter 2013 editorials for the 2014 prize is Jan. 25. More information is here.

Political writer spotlights GOP congressman who knows how to channel, cool Tea Party fervor

By Al Cross
Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues

We live in a country where politics seems more polarized than ever, sometimes on a rural-urban divide, and the most divisive players on the left and right get most of the news-media attention. But there are plenty of Republicans and Democrats who pass up the chances to throw rhetorical red meat to their political bases, and U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents Oklahoma's strongly Republican and relatively rural Fourth Congressional District, is one. That is made clear in a story in The New York Times by John Harwood, who accompanied Cole in the district during the August recess.

Rep. Tom Cole, in his district
Harwood's story is headlined "A Different Way for Republicans to Handle Tea Party Seal," which is certainly a timely topic, but the same lessons apply to Democrats and their urban, liberal bases. The easy-talking, matter-of-fact Rep. John Yarmuth of Louisville, Harwood's hometown, is in some ways of mirror image to Cole, left, who comes across in Harwood's piece as a calming influence in a political system that is lurching from crisis to crisis.

Harwood writes that the energy in the Tea Party often makes it harder for Republicans to govern and to win general elections. "Some Republican politicians display an ability to absorb the heat and reflect it back in more politically promising directions," he reports. "That’s why 2016 presidential hopefuls and House leaders could learn from recent town meetings" held by Cole, who "challenged unhappy constituents on tactics, tone and spirit."

Three elements in Cole's approach stood out to Harwood: Realism, about the impracticality of shutting down the government to thwart health reform, and the smallness of foreign aid in the federal budget, for example respect for liberal Democrats, in the face of constituents who consider their elections illegitimate and optimism about the future of the nation: “I’m not one of these people who thinks the country is going to hell in a handbasket.” (Read more)


Pulitzer Prize board chair wants more editorial entries, especially from smaller newspapers

The chair of the Pulitzer Prize board wants more entries in the editorial-writing competition, and that includes small news organizations.

"You can zero in on important community issues, drawing on your local expertise and insight to produce persuasive editorials," Paul Tash writes, citing the standard for the $5,000 prize: "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction."

That can be accomplished at a newspaper of 2,000 circulation or 200,000, and there have been many examples, from the Golden Quill contest of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors to the Pulitzers themselves. The 2009 prize went to Mark Mahoney, left, of The Post-Star in Glens Falls, N.Y., circulation 35,000, for his editorials showing the danger of secrecy in local government. For more on Mahoney, click here.

Only 54 people put in for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing. No Pulitzer was given for editorial writing in 2012 and 2008, showing that major newspapers often fall short of the standard. Bernard Stein of the weekly Riverdale Press of New York City won in 1998, and Albert Scardino of the weekly Georgia Gazette won in 1984. Roger Linscott of The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Mass., and Paul Greenberg of the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial won in 1972 and 1969, respectively, for editorials on various subjects, showing that the winner does not have to mount an editorial crusade or work for a large newspaper.

No item about rural editors winning Pulitzers would be complete without mention of Hazel Brannon Smith, who won in 1964 but lost her newspaper "for steadfast adherence to her editorial duty in the face of great pressure and opposition" to her support of civil rights in Mississippi Buford Boone of the Tuscaloosa News, who won in 1957 for "fearless and reasoned editorials in a community inflamed by a segregation issue," and Hodding Carter Sr. of the Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville, Miss., who won in 1946 for editorials about racial, religious and economic intolerance.

The deadline to enter 2013 editorials for the 2014 prize is Jan. 25. More information is here.

Political writer spotlights GOP congressman who knows how to channel, cool Tea Party fervor

By Al Cross
Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues

We live in a country where politics seems more polarized than ever, sometimes on a rural-urban divide, and the most divisive players on the left and right get most of the news-media attention. But there are plenty of Republicans and Democrats who pass up the chances to throw rhetorical red meat to their political bases, and U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents Oklahoma's strongly Republican and relatively rural Fourth Congressional District, is one. That is made clear in a story in The New York Times by John Harwood, who accompanied Cole in the district during the August recess.

Rep. Tom Cole, in his district
Harwood's story is headlined "A Different Way for Republicans to Handle Tea Party Seal," which is certainly a timely topic, but the same lessons apply to Democrats and their urban, liberal bases. The easy-talking, matter-of-fact Rep. John Yarmuth of Louisville, Harwood's hometown, is in some ways of mirror image to Cole, left, who comes across in Harwood's piece as a calming influence in a political system that is lurching from crisis to crisis.

Harwood writes that the energy in the Tea Party often makes it harder for Republicans to govern and to win general elections. "Some Republican politicians display an ability to absorb the heat and reflect it back in more politically promising directions," he reports. "That’s why 2016 presidential hopefuls and House leaders could learn from recent town meetings" held by Cole, who "challenged unhappy constituents on tactics, tone and spirit."

Three elements in Cole's approach stood out to Harwood: Realism, about the impracticality of shutting down the government to thwart health reform, and the smallness of foreign aid in the federal budget, for example respect for liberal Democrats, in the face of constituents who consider their elections illegitimate and optimism about the future of the nation: “I’m not one of these people who thinks the country is going to hell in a handbasket.” (Read more)


Pulitzer Prize board chair wants more editorial entries, especially from smaller newspapers

The chair of the Pulitzer Prize board wants more entries in the editorial-writing competition, and that includes small news organizations.

"You can zero in on important community issues, drawing on your local expertise and insight to produce persuasive editorials," Paul Tash writes, citing the standard for the $5,000 prize: "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction."

That can be accomplished at a newspaper of 2,000 circulation or 200,000, and there have been many examples, from the Golden Quill contest of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors to the Pulitzers themselves. The 2009 prize went to Mark Mahoney, left, of The Post-Star in Glens Falls, N.Y., circulation 35,000, for his editorials showing the danger of secrecy in local government. For more on Mahoney, click here.

Only 54 people put in for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing. No Pulitzer was given for editorial writing in 2012 and 2008, showing that major newspapers often fall short of the standard. Bernard Stein of the weekly Riverdale Press of New York City won in 1998, and Albert Scardino of the weekly Georgia Gazette won in 1984. Roger Linscott of The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Mass., and Paul Greenberg of the Pine Bluff (Ark.) Commercial won in 1972 and 1969, respectively, for editorials on various subjects, showing that the winner does not have to mount an editorial crusade or work for a large newspaper.

No item about rural editors winning Pulitzers would be complete without mention of Hazel Brannon Smith, who won in 1964 but lost her newspaper "for steadfast adherence to her editorial duty in the face of great pressure and opposition" to her support of civil rights in Mississippi Buford Boone of the Tuscaloosa News, who won in 1957 for "fearless and reasoned editorials in a community inflamed by a segregation issue," and Hodding Carter Sr. of the Delta Democrat-Times of Greenville, Miss., who won in 1946 for editorials about racial, religious and economic intolerance.

The deadline to enter 2013 editorials for the 2014 prize is Jan. 25. More information is here.

Political writer spotlights GOP congressman who knows how to channel, cool Tea Party fervor

By Al Cross
Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues

We live in a country where politics seems more polarized than ever, sometimes on a rural-urban divide, and the most divisive players on the left and right get most of the news-media attention. But there are plenty of Republicans and Democrats who pass up the chances to throw rhetorical red meat to their political bases, and U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, who represents Oklahoma's strongly Republican and relatively rural Fourth Congressional District, is one. That is made clear in a story in The New York Times by John Harwood, who accompanied Cole in the district during the August recess.

Rep. Tom Cole, in his district
Harwood's story is headlined "A Different Way for Republicans to Handle Tea Party Seal," which is certainly a timely topic, but the same lessons apply to Democrats and their urban, liberal bases. The easy-talking, matter-of-fact Rep. John Yarmuth of Louisville, Harwood's hometown, is in some ways of mirror image to Cole, left, who comes across in Harwood's piece as a calming influence in a political system that is lurching from crisis to crisis.

Harwood writes that the energy in the Tea Party often makes it harder for Republicans to govern and to win general elections. "Some Republican politicians display an ability to absorb the heat and reflect it back in more politically promising directions," he reports. "That’s why 2016 presidential hopefuls and House leaders could learn from recent town meetings" held by Cole, who "challenged unhappy constituents on tactics, tone and spirit."

Three elements in Cole's approach stood out to Harwood: Realism, about the impracticality of shutting down the government to thwart health reform, and the smallness of foreign aid in the federal budget, for example respect for liberal Democrats, in the face of constituents who consider their elections illegitimate and optimism about the future of the nation: “I’m not one of these people who thinks the country is going to hell in a handbasket.” (Read more)


Watch the video: Lana Del Rey. Diet Mountain Dew Demo (January 2022).