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5 Ways to Tell Your Folks You’re Not Coming Home for Thanksgiving


It’s not easy, but there is a way to break the news to your parents that you won’t make it home this year

Here are five ways to tell your parents you can’t make it home for Thanksgiving.

We’ve all been there: Thanksgiving rolls around, things are a bit tight perhaps, or maybe you’ve become seriously involved with someone, and you just can’t make it home this year. It’s heartbreaking, we know, but there are ways to nicely break the news to your folks.

If you’re in college: Tell them you have a huge project coming up, and you want to do really, really, really well and make them proud. Send them a Thanksgiving card.

If you’re overseas: Tell them you’ll Facetime them during Thanksgiving dinner, and you’ll sit with some cold-cut turkey on your plate and eat with them.

If it’s just too difficult to swing: Tell them that as much as you’d love to get home for Thanksgiving, the plane tickets are just too much. Then send them a food basket to make up for it.

If you’re dating someone: Say something like, “Since we always have so much more fun over Christmas, I said I’d go to [insert significant other’s name here]’s house for Thanksgiving.” Then, send them some cookies.

If you’re hungover: Blame Thanksgiving Eve. Then, take a selfie of your hungover self and send it with the hashtag #partypooper (warning: this will only work with very understanding family members).


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“It's often been described as our ‘Scarlet Letter’ of 2020,” said Feliciano. “People are often labeled as if they did something wrong, and then ostracized on some level. And now, with all the kids in school, it's even worse because your actions can literally shut down a dozen classrooms.”


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“It's often been described as our ‘Scarlet Letter’ of 2020,” said Feliciano. “People are often labeled as if they did something wrong, and then ostracized on some level. And now, with all the kids in school, it's even worse because your actions can literally shut down a dozen classrooms.”


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Afraid to tell people you’ve got COVID-19, the deadly virus that’s killed over a million people worldwide? You're not alone. Niro Feliciano, a cognitive psychotherapist and host of the podcast “Coping With The New Normal of COVID-19,” has treated multiple patients who’ve been diagnosed with the coronavirus, and she told TODAY that many of them are afraid that sharing the news will turn them into pariahs.

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Afraid to tell people you’ve got COVID-19, the deadly virus that’s killed over a million people worldwide? You're not alone. Niro Feliciano, a cognitive psychotherapist and host of the podcast “Coping With The New Normal of COVID-19,” has treated multiple patients who’ve been diagnosed with the coronavirus, and she told TODAY that many of them are afraid that sharing the news will turn them into pariahs.

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Afraid to tell people you’ve got COVID-19, the deadly virus that’s killed over a million people worldwide? You're not alone. Niro Feliciano, a cognitive psychotherapist and host of the podcast “Coping With The New Normal of COVID-19,” has treated multiple patients who’ve been diagnosed with the coronavirus, and she told TODAY that many of them are afraid that sharing the news will turn them into pariahs.

“It's often been described as our ‘Scarlet Letter’ of 2020,” said Feliciano. “People are often labeled as if they did something wrong, and then ostracized on some level. And now, with all the kids in school, it's even worse because your actions can literally shut down a dozen classrooms.”


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Afraid to tell people you’ve got COVID-19, the deadly virus that’s killed over a million people worldwide? You're not alone. Niro Feliciano, a cognitive psychotherapist and host of the podcast “Coping With The New Normal of COVID-19,” has treated multiple patients who’ve been diagnosed with the coronavirus, and she told TODAY that many of them are afraid that sharing the news will turn them into pariahs.

“It's often been described as our ‘Scarlet Letter’ of 2020,” said Feliciano. “People are often labeled as if they did something wrong, and then ostracized on some level. And now, with all the kids in school, it's even worse because your actions can literally shut down a dozen classrooms.”


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Afraid to tell people you’ve got COVID-19, the deadly virus that’s killed over a million people worldwide? You're not alone. Niro Feliciano, a cognitive psychotherapist and host of the podcast “Coping With The New Normal of COVID-19,” has treated multiple patients who’ve been diagnosed with the coronavirus, and she told TODAY that many of them are afraid that sharing the news will turn them into pariahs.

“It's often been described as our ‘Scarlet Letter’ of 2020,” said Feliciano. “People are often labeled as if they did something wrong, and then ostracized on some level. And now, with all the kids in school, it's even worse because your actions can literally shut down a dozen classrooms.”


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Afraid to tell people you’ve got COVID-19, the deadly virus that’s killed over a million people worldwide? You're not alone. Niro Feliciano, a cognitive psychotherapist and host of the podcast “Coping With The New Normal of COVID-19,” has treated multiple patients who’ve been diagnosed with the coronavirus, and she told TODAY that many of them are afraid that sharing the news will turn them into pariahs.

“It's often been described as our ‘Scarlet Letter’ of 2020,” said Feliciano. “People are often labeled as if they did something wrong, and then ostracized on some level. And now, with all the kids in school, it's even worse because your actions can literally shut down a dozen classrooms.”


How to tell people you have COVID-19

Afraid to tell people you’ve got COVID-19, the deadly virus that’s killed over a million people worldwide? You're not alone. Niro Feliciano, a cognitive psychotherapist and host of the podcast “Coping With The New Normal of COVID-19,” has treated multiple patients who’ve been diagnosed with the coronavirus, and she told TODAY that many of them are afraid that sharing the news will turn them into pariahs.

“It's often been described as our ‘Scarlet Letter’ of 2020,” said Feliciano. “People are often labeled as if they did something wrong, and then ostracized on some level. And now, with all the kids in school, it's even worse because your actions can literally shut down a dozen classrooms.”