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Flint Water Crisis Triggers New Bill That Would Help Eliminate Lead From Our Water Supply


New York is looking to implement a $7 billion initiative that would help keep lead out of our tap water nationwide

New York is one of the many states cracking down on water safety.

Since the Flint, Michigan, scandal, which has recently resulted in charges connected with the deliberate cover-up of unsafe lead levels in drinking water, government officials around the nation have scrambled to double-check and improve the safety of their own water supplies. New York Senators Chuck Schumer and Kristen Gillibrand are leading the charge to approve a $7 billion annual initiative to ensure that dangerous levels of lead (and other chemicals) stay out of our tap water nationwide, for good.

“Flint helped bring this issue to the forefront,” Senator Schumer told NBC affiliate WGRZ.

Senate Democrats plan to vote on the proposal next week. However, even if the bill is passed, it won’t provide the massive federal funding needed to implement the ideas.

About 350 schools and daycare centers failed tests for lead in drinking water from 2012 through 2015, according to data provided by the Environmental Protection Agency.

According to the proposal, both schools and private homes of up to $110,000 annual income would be eligible for tax reimbursement for testing and new plumbing installation.


The Nation's Poisonous Water Problem Is Far Worse Than You Think

It's a day of the week ending in "y", so yes, there's another story about how fcked the American infrastructure that services our drinking water really is. This time, it's The Guardian, which has demonstrated that Flint was not the only American city that was fudging the test results regarding how much lead was in its water supply.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal: Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water officials in two major cities&mdashPhiladelphia and Chicago&mdashasked employees to test water safety in their own homes two states&mdashMichigan and New Hampshire&mdashadvised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.

Experts seem rather displeased.

Some of the ways that city and state officials have used to cheat the system would be laughable, if the consequences weren't so serious.

Philadelphia, a city accused of having the

You will note that, in all of these cases, the officials were advised to make sure that the lead levels were lower than they appeared to be. If this were a couple of cities, you could make a case that the cities were breaking all this rock to avoid public panic. But 33 cities? There's a tangle of motives there&mdashlassitude, inertia, underfunded regulators, greed.

In the nine years since the EPA last updated lead regulations, a substantial body of

There is no question that, between this story and what happened in Flint, something is amiss at the EPA regarding its oversight policies on water quality. I suspect that whatever it is can probably be solved by a judicious increase in its regulatory budget.

However, I would almost guarantee you that, some time in the next week or so, you will hear something from someone about how this proves that the EPA is useless and should be done away with and its functions handed over to some private entity that will guarantee pure water for everyone&mdashat a decent profit, of course.


The Nation's Poisonous Water Problem Is Far Worse Than You Think

It's a day of the week ending in "y", so yes, there's another story about how fcked the American infrastructure that services our drinking water really is. This time, it's The Guardian, which has demonstrated that Flint was not the only American city that was fudging the test results regarding how much lead was in its water supply.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal: Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water officials in two major cities&mdashPhiladelphia and Chicago&mdashasked employees to test water safety in their own homes two states&mdashMichigan and New Hampshire&mdashadvised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.

Experts seem rather displeased.

Some of the ways that city and state officials have used to cheat the system would be laughable, if the consequences weren't so serious.

Philadelphia, a city accused of having the

You will note that, in all of these cases, the officials were advised to make sure that the lead levels were lower than they appeared to be. If this were a couple of cities, you could make a case that the cities were breaking all this rock to avoid public panic. But 33 cities? There's a tangle of motives there&mdashlassitude, inertia, underfunded regulators, greed.

In the nine years since the EPA last updated lead regulations, a substantial body of

There is no question that, between this story and what happened in Flint, something is amiss at the EPA regarding its oversight policies on water quality. I suspect that whatever it is can probably be solved by a judicious increase in its regulatory budget.

However, I would almost guarantee you that, some time in the next week or so, you will hear something from someone about how this proves that the EPA is useless and should be done away with and its functions handed over to some private entity that will guarantee pure water for everyone&mdashat a decent profit, of course.


The Nation's Poisonous Water Problem Is Far Worse Than You Think

It's a day of the week ending in "y", so yes, there's another story about how fcked the American infrastructure that services our drinking water really is. This time, it's The Guardian, which has demonstrated that Flint was not the only American city that was fudging the test results regarding how much lead was in its water supply.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal: Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water officials in two major cities&mdashPhiladelphia and Chicago&mdashasked employees to test water safety in their own homes two states&mdashMichigan and New Hampshire&mdashadvised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.

Experts seem rather displeased.

Some of the ways that city and state officials have used to cheat the system would be laughable, if the consequences weren't so serious.

Philadelphia, a city accused of having the

You will note that, in all of these cases, the officials were advised to make sure that the lead levels were lower than they appeared to be. If this were a couple of cities, you could make a case that the cities were breaking all this rock to avoid public panic. But 33 cities? There's a tangle of motives there&mdashlassitude, inertia, underfunded regulators, greed.

In the nine years since the EPA last updated lead regulations, a substantial body of

There is no question that, between this story and what happened in Flint, something is amiss at the EPA regarding its oversight policies on water quality. I suspect that whatever it is can probably be solved by a judicious increase in its regulatory budget.

However, I would almost guarantee you that, some time in the next week or so, you will hear something from someone about how this proves that the EPA is useless and should be done away with and its functions handed over to some private entity that will guarantee pure water for everyone&mdashat a decent profit, of course.


The Nation's Poisonous Water Problem Is Far Worse Than You Think

It's a day of the week ending in "y", so yes, there's another story about how fcked the American infrastructure that services our drinking water really is. This time, it's The Guardian, which has demonstrated that Flint was not the only American city that was fudging the test results regarding how much lead was in its water supply.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal: Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water officials in two major cities&mdashPhiladelphia and Chicago&mdashasked employees to test water safety in their own homes two states&mdashMichigan and New Hampshire&mdashadvised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.

Experts seem rather displeased.

Some of the ways that city and state officials have used to cheat the system would be laughable, if the consequences weren't so serious.

Philadelphia, a city accused of having the

You will note that, in all of these cases, the officials were advised to make sure that the lead levels were lower than they appeared to be. If this were a couple of cities, you could make a case that the cities were breaking all this rock to avoid public panic. But 33 cities? There's a tangle of motives there&mdashlassitude, inertia, underfunded regulators, greed.

In the nine years since the EPA last updated lead regulations, a substantial body of

There is no question that, between this story and what happened in Flint, something is amiss at the EPA regarding its oversight policies on water quality. I suspect that whatever it is can probably be solved by a judicious increase in its regulatory budget.

However, I would almost guarantee you that, some time in the next week or so, you will hear something from someone about how this proves that the EPA is useless and should be done away with and its functions handed over to some private entity that will guarantee pure water for everyone&mdashat a decent profit, of course.


The Nation's Poisonous Water Problem Is Far Worse Than You Think

It's a day of the week ending in "y", so yes, there's another story about how fcked the American infrastructure that services our drinking water really is. This time, it's The Guardian, which has demonstrated that Flint was not the only American city that was fudging the test results regarding how much lead was in its water supply.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal: Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water officials in two major cities&mdashPhiladelphia and Chicago&mdashasked employees to test water safety in their own homes two states&mdashMichigan and New Hampshire&mdashadvised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.

Experts seem rather displeased.

Some of the ways that city and state officials have used to cheat the system would be laughable, if the consequences weren't so serious.

Philadelphia, a city accused of having the

You will note that, in all of these cases, the officials were advised to make sure that the lead levels were lower than they appeared to be. If this were a couple of cities, you could make a case that the cities were breaking all this rock to avoid public panic. But 33 cities? There's a tangle of motives there&mdashlassitude, inertia, underfunded regulators, greed.

In the nine years since the EPA last updated lead regulations, a substantial body of

There is no question that, between this story and what happened in Flint, something is amiss at the EPA regarding its oversight policies on water quality. I suspect that whatever it is can probably be solved by a judicious increase in its regulatory budget.

However, I would almost guarantee you that, some time in the next week or so, you will hear something from someone about how this proves that the EPA is useless and should be done away with and its functions handed over to some private entity that will guarantee pure water for everyone&mdashat a decent profit, of course.


The Nation's Poisonous Water Problem Is Far Worse Than You Think

It's a day of the week ending in "y", so yes, there's another story about how fcked the American infrastructure that services our drinking water really is. This time, it's The Guardian, which has demonstrated that Flint was not the only American city that was fudging the test results regarding how much lead was in its water supply.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal: Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water officials in two major cities&mdashPhiladelphia and Chicago&mdashasked employees to test water safety in their own homes two states&mdashMichigan and New Hampshire&mdashadvised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.

Experts seem rather displeased.

Some of the ways that city and state officials have used to cheat the system would be laughable, if the consequences weren't so serious.

Philadelphia, a city accused of having the

You will note that, in all of these cases, the officials were advised to make sure that the lead levels were lower than they appeared to be. If this were a couple of cities, you could make a case that the cities were breaking all this rock to avoid public panic. But 33 cities? There's a tangle of motives there&mdashlassitude, inertia, underfunded regulators, greed.

In the nine years since the EPA last updated lead regulations, a substantial body of

There is no question that, between this story and what happened in Flint, something is amiss at the EPA regarding its oversight policies on water quality. I suspect that whatever it is can probably be solved by a judicious increase in its regulatory budget.

However, I would almost guarantee you that, some time in the next week or so, you will hear something from someone about how this proves that the EPA is useless and should be done away with and its functions handed over to some private entity that will guarantee pure water for everyone&mdashat a decent profit, of course.


The Nation's Poisonous Water Problem Is Far Worse Than You Think

It's a day of the week ending in "y", so yes, there's another story about how fcked the American infrastructure that services our drinking water really is. This time, it's The Guardian, which has demonstrated that Flint was not the only American city that was fudging the test results regarding how much lead was in its water supply.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal: Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water officials in two major cities&mdashPhiladelphia and Chicago&mdashasked employees to test water safety in their own homes two states&mdashMichigan and New Hampshire&mdashadvised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.

Experts seem rather displeased.

Some of the ways that city and state officials have used to cheat the system would be laughable, if the consequences weren't so serious.

Philadelphia, a city accused of having the

You will note that, in all of these cases, the officials were advised to make sure that the lead levels were lower than they appeared to be. If this were a couple of cities, you could make a case that the cities were breaking all this rock to avoid public panic. But 33 cities? There's a tangle of motives there&mdashlassitude, inertia, underfunded regulators, greed.

In the nine years since the EPA last updated lead regulations, a substantial body of

There is no question that, between this story and what happened in Flint, something is amiss at the EPA regarding its oversight policies on water quality. I suspect that whatever it is can probably be solved by a judicious increase in its regulatory budget.

However, I would almost guarantee you that, some time in the next week or so, you will hear something from someone about how this proves that the EPA is useless and should be done away with and its functions handed over to some private entity that will guarantee pure water for everyone&mdashat a decent profit, of course.


The Nation's Poisonous Water Problem Is Far Worse Than You Think

It's a day of the week ending in "y", so yes, there's another story about how fcked the American infrastructure that services our drinking water really is. This time, it's The Guardian, which has demonstrated that Flint was not the only American city that was fudging the test results regarding how much lead was in its water supply.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal: Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water officials in two major cities&mdashPhiladelphia and Chicago&mdashasked employees to test water safety in their own homes two states&mdashMichigan and New Hampshire&mdashadvised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.

Experts seem rather displeased.

Some of the ways that city and state officials have used to cheat the system would be laughable, if the consequences weren't so serious.

Philadelphia, a city accused of having the

You will note that, in all of these cases, the officials were advised to make sure that the lead levels were lower than they appeared to be. If this were a couple of cities, you could make a case that the cities were breaking all this rock to avoid public panic. But 33 cities? There's a tangle of motives there&mdashlassitude, inertia, underfunded regulators, greed.

In the nine years since the EPA last updated lead regulations, a substantial body of

There is no question that, between this story and what happened in Flint, something is amiss at the EPA regarding its oversight policies on water quality. I suspect that whatever it is can probably be solved by a judicious increase in its regulatory budget.

However, I would almost guarantee you that, some time in the next week or so, you will hear something from someone about how this proves that the EPA is useless and should be done away with and its functions handed over to some private entity that will guarantee pure water for everyone&mdashat a decent profit, of course.


The Nation's Poisonous Water Problem Is Far Worse Than You Think

It's a day of the week ending in "y", so yes, there's another story about how fcked the American infrastructure that services our drinking water really is. This time, it's The Guardian, which has demonstrated that Flint was not the only American city that was fudging the test results regarding how much lead was in its water supply.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal: Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water officials in two major cities&mdashPhiladelphia and Chicago&mdashasked employees to test water safety in their own homes two states&mdashMichigan and New Hampshire&mdashadvised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.

Experts seem rather displeased.

Some of the ways that city and state officials have used to cheat the system would be laughable, if the consequences weren't so serious.

Philadelphia, a city accused of having the

You will note that, in all of these cases, the officials were advised to make sure that the lead levels were lower than they appeared to be. If this were a couple of cities, you could make a case that the cities were breaking all this rock to avoid public panic. But 33 cities? There's a tangle of motives there&mdashlassitude, inertia, underfunded regulators, greed.

In the nine years since the EPA last updated lead regulations, a substantial body of

There is no question that, between this story and what happened in Flint, something is amiss at the EPA regarding its oversight policies on water quality. I suspect that whatever it is can probably be solved by a judicious increase in its regulatory budget.

However, I would almost guarantee you that, some time in the next week or so, you will hear something from someone about how this proves that the EPA is useless and should be done away with and its functions handed over to some private entity that will guarantee pure water for everyone&mdashat a decent profit, of course.


The Nation's Poisonous Water Problem Is Far Worse Than You Think

It's a day of the week ending in "y", so yes, there's another story about how fcked the American infrastructure that services our drinking water really is. This time, it's The Guardian, which has demonstrated that Flint was not the only American city that was fudging the test results regarding how much lead was in its water supply.

Thousands of documents detailing water testing practices over the past decade reveal: Despite warnings of regulators and experts, water departments in at least 33 cities used testing methods over the past decade that could underestimate lead found in drinking water officials in two major cities&mdashPhiladelphia and Chicago&mdashasked employees to test water safety in their own homes two states&mdashMichigan and New Hampshire&mdashadvised water departments to give themselves extra time to complete tests so that if lead contamination exceeded federal limits, officials could re-sample and remove results with high lead levels some cities denied knowledge of the locations of lead pipes, failed to sample the required number of homes with lead plumbing or refused to release lead pipe maps, claiming it was a security risk.

Experts seem rather displeased.

Some of the ways that city and state officials have used to cheat the system would be laughable, if the consequences weren't so serious.

Philadelphia, a city accused of having the

You will note that, in all of these cases, the officials were advised to make sure that the lead levels were lower than they appeared to be. If this were a couple of cities, you could make a case that the cities were breaking all this rock to avoid public panic. But 33 cities? There's a tangle of motives there&mdashlassitude, inertia, underfunded regulators, greed.

In the nine years since the EPA last updated lead regulations, a substantial body of

There is no question that, between this story and what happened in Flint, something is amiss at the EPA regarding its oversight policies on water quality. I suspect that whatever it is can probably be solved by a judicious increase in its regulatory budget.

However, I would almost guarantee you that, some time in the next week or so, you will hear something from someone about how this proves that the EPA is useless and should be done away with and its functions handed over to some private entity that will guarantee pure water for everyone&mdashat a decent profit, of course.